The Philadelphia Inquirer has a great article up which delves into the lobbying cash special interests are using to influence public policy in that city. Big Soda leads the lobbying pack, spending $238,921 in the quarter, six times the amount spent by the next competitor.

Interestingly, the article notes that cable giant Comcast spent $32,985 lobbying during this period, lobbying 15 council members against supporting mandatory paid sick leave for workers. This is the same city where a woman was fired after having to take a sick day to save her son’s life with a kidney donation.

Comcast is a huge political spender not only in Philadelphia, but nationwide. It has spent $2,371,041 lobbying the federal government in 2012 so far, and that’s just the spending that’s being reported. Comcast also spends big on public relations, donations to nonprofit advocacy organizations, and other forms of stealth lobbying that are not required to be reported.

And amazingly, this is all being done with the fees its users pay for cable and Internet service (or lack of service, if you’re one of many disgruntled Comcast customers).

 

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Filed under: Lobbying

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  • hbfr

    I don’t mean to diminish the issue, but it should be noted that the city council in Philadelphia passed the mandatory sick leave bill, it was then vetoed by Mayor Nutter. They later passed a similar bill that I believe only applies to companies with contracts from the city.

    • Avaritia

      Maybe now you understand why.

  • Avaritia

    Every Republican knows that it’s the workers’ fault for getting sick. So screw them and god bless the Republicans.

  • CatKinNY

    There is one silver lining in the slow rolling disaster that has been engulfing the American middle class for the past 35 years and reached tsunami levels in 2008: as more and more of us slip down the ladder from the middle to working poor, a lot of us will surely come to the realization that we can’t afford our cable packages and that the library is free. Allowing ourselves to be distracted by a cornucopia of crap from doing our civic duty to keep abreast of current affairs has a great deal to do with how we got into this mess in the first place. Does Fox news broadcast in most markets? I don’t think so. I magine the amount of good that could result from half of Fox viewers having to get their news elsewhere?

  • Pingback: Free your mind from the tentacles of the CONSUMERIST GREED MONSTER | Voices from the Corporation()

  • ThatLittleWeCanDo

    I appreciate CatKinNY’s observation that cable TV is part of the bigger problems we face: Democracy cannot exist if there is no forum in which voters can get truthful and unbiased information and have an opportunity to participate in dialogue about political issues. The answer is a wise use of the internet. When my children were young, I did not want them to be exposed to advertising that encouraged junk food and anytime eating, that promoted values of greed, selfishness and materialism, that taught them to create a persona based on the brands that they choose. So we had no TV, but often watched TV shows via Netflix. Now Netflix, Amazon, ITunes, PBS, and others will let you stream commercial free TV shows via the internet! And there are Internet video news stations such as https://www.freespeech.org/

    So a want to see a movement to DROP the CABLE BILL and FREE YOURSELF FROM THE !
    OF THE CORPORATE GREED MACHINE!!

    Please join me at VoicesFromTheCorporation.org

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