August 24, 2012

On Politico: Taming the for-profit college monster

I have a piece today on Politico proposing a new approach to the abuses of for-profit colleges. Here’s an excerpt:

The for-profits have used our taxes to finance a race to the bottom: the more you abuse students, the more money you make. Their wealth may doom to failure the current approach to regulation, which has created benchmark after benchmark that schools must flunk to lose federal aid. Not only has the industry schemed to weaken and evade such tests, but also it has exploited opportunities to gain sympathy and support from non-profit and state colleges, when new rules add greater compliance burdens for those schools as well.

Although greater public awareness of for-profit college abuses has recently reduced student enrollments – and the share prices – for some for-profit colleges, these companies still can and do devote enormous resources to blocking accountability measures.

It’s time for a new approach to overseeing this taxpayer-dependent industry, one that starts by asserting that the evidence warrants treating for-profit colleges differently. For-profit education can be an important part of the landscape, but the tension between pleasing shareholders and serving students is now patently obvious.

The second tenet is that federal aid is, for a school, a privilege, not a right. Instead of new measures to determine whether aid should be taken away, for-profits should be required to apply anew for eligibility.

The U.S. Department of Education should house a nonpartisan board that establishes broad criteria for eligibility. The board, comprised of members without prior financial ties to for-profit education, would hold public proceedings and use expert judgment to make decisions. Approval would require a unanimous vote every two years. As much as possible, eligibility decisions should be insulated from legal maneuvering and court processes.

Please do check out the whole article.

 

 

 

 

  • Ethel Moskowitz, Esq.

    Just a few months ago, the national student debt reached 1 TRILLION DOLLARS. How’s that for disaster capitalism? I guess it’s now come to the point where the system is eating itself and enslaving the very citizens that were supposed to become its enablers, gatekeepers and dreamed of becoming the slave owners themselves. Imagine if, instead of fighting endless wars for oil in the Middle East and spying on the citizens at home, those several trillion bucks were put towards satisfying that debt and properly educating our youngsters. The US could truly become a beacon of enlightenment among the nations but, of course, that would deplete the bottomless pockets of our oligarchs who are for profit above all. So, let the race to the bottom continue, eventually, something will have to give up. Hopefully, it will be the heads of those who have got us into this mess.

  • Pingback: Miguel Dance Pieces & Dance to Confront Issues Physical Therapy Schools: Getting Your Masters in Physical Therapy | Symptoms()

  • just a form of extraction! even if a students graduates the jobs are minimum wage or a little more. the credits dont transfer therefore what is the purpose of these schools other than extraction of cash from people wanting to better themselves. if the government didn’t offer student loans and pell grants these schools would not exist. they have a win win situation. after all they cant help it if the student didn’t the grades. if these schools were made to offer credits that would transfer they would fall like flys.

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()

  • Pingback: Trackback()